National Teacher Appreciation Week

As our motto states, teaching sustainability IS everyone’s responsibility. We at Atwood Publishing applaud teachers of other subjects like math, reading, social studies, etc.. that also work in their curriculum the importance and necessity of sustainability. Here is a book that helps with that.

In celebration of National Teacher Appreciation Week, May 6th – 10th, we would like to showcase our authors/teachers of “147 Practical Tips for Teaching Sustainability: Connecting the Environment, the Economy, and Society”.

William M. Timpson is a Professor in the School of Education at Colorado State University where he teaches undergraduate and graduate courses. In addition, he heads the International Network for Sustainable Peace and Development within the School of Global Environmental Sustainability at CSU.

Bill has been an advocate for improving postsecondary education both as past Director of the Teaching and Learning Center at CSU, as an author and speaker on teaching enhancement, and research on the scholarship of teaching.

Long interested in issues of sustainability, peace, and equity, the topics are reflected in his scholarhip. His research, in part supported by a National Kellogg Fellowship and a Fulbright Fellowship, has focused on the topics from a global perspective.

BRIAN DUNBAR, LEED-Fellow (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design), is director of the Institute for the Built Environment (IBE), and professor emeritus at Colorado State University. Brian is also a leader with CLEAR (Center for Living Environments and Regeneration), a non-profit promoting healthy developments. Brian’s teaching, research, and design charrette facilitation have received numerous local, regional, and national awards.

GAILMARIE KIMMEL, M.Ed., M.A., brings 30 years of experience in community and university education. After participating in the Peace Corps, she staffed Peace and Conflict Studies at University of California at Berkeley and two Oakland churches, cofounded a multidisciplinary think tank, and directed an environmental camp. Currently, she works with the CSU Forest Service, linking sustainable land management with green building and bioenergy, and coordinates the Green Building Certificate Program for CSU’s IBE. She serves on the Board of Directors for the Rocky Mountain Sustainable Living Association and is launching its local living economy project.

BRETT BRUYERE, Ph.D., is director of the CSU Environmental Learning Center (ELC) and assistant professor in the Department of Natural Resource Recreation and Tourism. The ELC provides programs to thousands of students, families, and educators annually about environmental conservation.

PETER NEWMAN, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of protected areas management at the Warner College of Natural Resources at CSU. His research focuses on the human dimensions of natural resources management and visitor “carrying capacity”—i.e., the maximal population load that does not produce negative effects on the environment—in the context of protected areas management. He also has work experience as a National Park Service Ranger in the Division of Resources Management in Yosemite National Park and as a naturalist/instructor for the Yosemite Institute.

HILLARY MIZIA is a sustainability leader and strategist, facilitator, and community connector. She serves the greater community as the principal and founder of PriZm Sustainability and is deepening the Colorado connection as the Executive Director at Shadowcliff Mountain Lodge, a non-profit lodge and retreat center in Grand Lake, CO. She is currently the president of the board at Mountain Sage Community School. She holds a BA in Experiential Education from Prescott College and an MA in Environment and Community from Antioch University, Seattle. She lives life to the fullest in Fort Collins, CO with her family.

DANIEL BIRMINGHAM, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) education at Colorado State University. His research examines potential avenues to bridge community and school experiences in order to alter modes of participation in STEM and support transformative learning for youth from traditionally marginalized communities. His work occurs with youth and teachers in traditionally marginalized communities and has resulted in (1) better understanding of science learning experiences that are consequential for youth, (2) examining the ways in which science teachers can learn from experience, expertise, and cultural practices of these youth, and (3) providing insights into an innovative methodological model of youth design-based research.

RENÉE HARMON is a Ph.D. candidate in the School of Education at Colorado State University, research assistant and social media coordinator for CSU’s Africa Center, and an associate professor at National American University. Her research addresses sustainability literacy generally, as well as, teaching and learning sustainability education, in particular. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in Journalism from Western Illinois University, and a Master of Arts in Communication from the University of Missouri—St. Louis. She currently serves on the Northern Colorado Refugee Collaboration Committee in Weld County where she is working on a project to inform the Northern Colorado community about refugee resettlement and to build social relationships between cultures. Renée is also an avid hiker, having completed the Grand Canyons’ Rim-to-Rim-to-Rim hike in 2016.

Let the tips begin!

Hi there!

We’re so excited to be here in the blogosphere, and we hope you are too. To celebrate our new blog (this one you’re reading!) and to jump-start our weekly sampling of handy and thoughtful tips for educators, we’re laying out a veritable feast of not one but three handy tips from different books in our ever-popular 147 Tips series.

Let the tips begin!


From our first ever 147 Tips book, 147 Practical Tips for Teaching Professors, edited by Robert Magnan:

21. Don’t forget the spice.

      How often have we heard that variety is the spice of life? And how often do we think only in terms of matching delivery with material? Sometimes what’s appropriate for three minutes may not work for seven. Switch to another delivery a different tone, a different phrasing just for variety. In baseball terms, it’s not the pitch itself as much as the change of pace.


From one of our most popular distance learning titles, 147 Practical Tips for Teaching Online Groups, by Donald E. Hanna, Michelle Glowacki-Dudka, and Simone Conceição:

135. Help your learners manage information.

With an abundance of text-based resources, managing information becomes an important skill to acquire when learning online. This calls for managing access to resources, academic discourse, information flow, and service arrangements.

Include in your syllabus all of the possible ways learners can access information through Internet hyperlinks or web-based procedures that emphasize certain skills.


And from our most recent addition to the 147 Tips series, 147 Practical Tips for Using Experiential Learning, edited by William M. Timpson, Jeffrey M. Foley, Nathalie Kees, and Alina M. Waite:

4. Engage, connect, and construct.

In experiential education, learning is an active and constructive process where knowledge is constructed by the interaction of the learner directly with the phenomena. The facilitator works to engage participants with the knowledge/experience and with each other.

Here the learner is an active participant whose individual life experiences, loves, passions, biases, and prejudice are intimately involved in the learning process. Together groups of students can create vibrant learning communities.

For an upcoming session, diagram the ways in which you would like to see the flow of information, ideas, and power happen. How can this model help you understand a particularly meaningful experience in the past?


You can find the complete list of books in our 147 Tips series here: http://www.atwoodpublishing.com/subjects/Tips%20series.htm

Stay tuned for more great tips!