National Teacher Appreciation Week

As our motto states, teaching sustainability IS everyone’s responsibility. We at Atwood Publishing applaud teachers of other subjects like math, reading, social studies, etc.. that also work in their curriculum the importance and necessity of sustainability. Here is a book that helps with that.

In celebration of National Teacher Appreciation Week, May 6th – 10th, we would like to showcase our authors/teachers of “147 Practical Tips for Teaching Sustainability: Connecting the Environment, the Economy, and Society”.

William M. Timpson is a Professor in the School of Education at Colorado State University where he teaches undergraduate and graduate courses. In addition, he heads the International Network for Sustainable Peace and Development within the School of Global Environmental Sustainability at CSU.

Bill has been an advocate for improving postsecondary education both as past Director of the Teaching and Learning Center at CSU, as an author and speaker on teaching enhancement, and research on the scholarship of teaching.

Long interested in issues of sustainability, peace, and equity, the topics are reflected in his scholarhip. His research, in part supported by a National Kellogg Fellowship and a Fulbright Fellowship, has focused on the topics from a global perspective.

BRIAN DUNBAR, LEED-Fellow (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design), is director of the Institute for the Built Environment (IBE), and professor emeritus at Colorado State University. Brian is also a leader with CLEAR (Center for Living Environments and Regeneration), a non-profit promoting healthy developments. Brian’s teaching, research, and design charrette facilitation have received numerous local, regional, and national awards.

GAILMARIE KIMMEL, M.Ed., M.A., brings 30 years of experience in community and university education. After participating in the Peace Corps, she staffed Peace and Conflict Studies at University of California at Berkeley and two Oakland churches, cofounded a multidisciplinary think tank, and directed an environmental camp. Currently, she works with the CSU Forest Service, linking sustainable land management with green building and bioenergy, and coordinates the Green Building Certificate Program for CSU’s IBE. She serves on the Board of Directors for the Rocky Mountain Sustainable Living Association and is launching its local living economy project.

BRETT BRUYERE, Ph.D., is director of the CSU Environmental Learning Center (ELC) and assistant professor in the Department of Natural Resource Recreation and Tourism. The ELC provides programs to thousands of students, families, and educators annually about environmental conservation.

PETER NEWMAN, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of protected areas management at the Warner College of Natural Resources at CSU. His research focuses on the human dimensions of natural resources management and visitor “carrying capacity”—i.e., the maximal population load that does not produce negative effects on the environment—in the context of protected areas management. He also has work experience as a National Park Service Ranger in the Division of Resources Management in Yosemite National Park and as a naturalist/instructor for the Yosemite Institute.

HILLARY MIZIA is a sustainability leader and strategist, facilitator, and community connector. She serves the greater community as the principal and founder of PriZm Sustainability and is deepening the Colorado connection as the Executive Director at Shadowcliff Mountain Lodge, a non-profit lodge and retreat center in Grand Lake, CO. She is currently the president of the board at Mountain Sage Community School. She holds a BA in Experiential Education from Prescott College and an MA in Environment and Community from Antioch University, Seattle. She lives life to the fullest in Fort Collins, CO with her family.

DANIEL BIRMINGHAM, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) education at Colorado State University. His research examines potential avenues to bridge community and school experiences in order to alter modes of participation in STEM and support transformative learning for youth from traditionally marginalized communities. His work occurs with youth and teachers in traditionally marginalized communities and has resulted in (1) better understanding of science learning experiences that are consequential for youth, (2) examining the ways in which science teachers can learn from experience, expertise, and cultural practices of these youth, and (3) providing insights into an innovative methodological model of youth design-based research.

RENÉE HARMON is a Ph.D. candidate in the School of Education at Colorado State University, research assistant and social media coordinator for CSU’s Africa Center, and an associate professor at National American University. Her research addresses sustainability literacy generally, as well as, teaching and learning sustainability education, in particular. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in Journalism from Western Illinois University, and a Master of Arts in Communication from the University of Missouri—St. Louis. She currently serves on the Northern Colorado Refugee Collaboration Committee in Weld County where she is working on a project to inform the Northern Colorado community about refugee resettlement and to build social relationships between cultures. Renée is also an avid hiker, having completed the Grand Canyons’ Rim-to-Rim-to-Rim hike in 2016.

April 22nd is Earth Day

“Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better. It’s not.” Lorax from Dr. Seuss

“Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better.  It’s not.”   LORAX  from Dr. Seuss
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Did you know that more people die from drinking unsafe water annually than from all forms of violence, including war? Children under the age of 5 are the most affected. How can this still be happening in 2019? How can Flint, Michigan still not have clean drinking water?


Join Earth Day Network in the fight for clean water for all. 💪 Sign up at http://bit.ly/2JSqELF#ec2020UN-Water

Tips of the Week

Continuing in our brand-new (but sure to be time-honored) tradition of tip-sharing via blog, we present you with the Tips of the Week. Savor and mull over these delightful morsels of education advice, and check back in next Tuesday for more!


With warm temperatures finally hitting Madison, WI (where Atwood is based), and spring making itself felt in earnest across the country, the topic of icebreakers seems appropriate. From 147 Practical Tips for Using Icebreakers with College Students by Robert Magnan comes this handy tip:

48. Find out more through follow-up questions.

You can intervene after an answer by asking a follow-up question. Here are some examples. The question “Who here is planning on a career in this field?” could lead naturally to “What do you want to do specifically?” The question “Who here would like to take this course pass/fail or for no grade?” could lead logically to “Why?” The question “Who here reads books in this field for fun?” could lead to “What have you read lately?” or “Which books would you recommend to other students?”


Spring is also a great time to think about sustainability. With green leaves and grass all around us and fresh air in our lungs, the natural world cannot be ignored. From 147 Practical Tips for Teaching Sustainability by William M. Timpson, Brian Dunbar, Gailmarie Kimmel, Brett Bruyere, Peter Newman, and Hillary Mizia, comes this delightful suggestion:

83. Develop Natural Schoolyards.

Students learning from nature at school is so important. Outside areas can be converted to gardens for what once grew locally. Students can see what it is like to grow gourds in the fall, tend the land, observe the wildlife, and participate in the process of nurturing plants and protecting wildlife.


Last but not least, any time is a perfect time to learn about the tricks and  advantages of implementing online technology in your education practice. 147 Practical Tips for Synchronous and Blended Technology Teaching and Learning by Rosemary M. Lehman and Richard A. Berg guides you in that process with tips like this one:

97. Use learned presentation skills.

If you are using videoconferencing, webconferencing, or webcasting, your course participants will spend a great deal of time watching you and listening to you. Remember that your presentation skills will be magnified through the lens of the camera and through the microphone. Learn about presentation skills and practice them. It’s always a good idea to practice your presentation skills with a pilot audience for feedback and critique, or tape yourself while you’re presenting and watch the tape for self-critique.