Let the tips begin!

Hi there!

We’re so excited to be here in the blogosphere, and we hope you are too. To celebrate our new blog (this one you’re reading!) and to jump-start our weekly sampling of handy and thoughtful tips for educators, we’re laying out a veritable feast of not one but three handy tips from different books in our ever-popular 147 Tips series.

Let the tips begin!


From our first ever 147 Tips book, 147 Practical Tips for Teaching Professors, edited by Robert Magnan:

21. Don’t forget the spice.

      How often have we heard that variety is the spice of life? And how often do we think only in terms of matching delivery with material? Sometimes what’s appropriate for three minutes may not work for seven. Switch to another delivery a different tone, a different phrasing just for variety. In baseball terms, it’s not the pitch itself as much as the change of pace.


From one of our most popular distance learning titles, 147 Practical Tips for Teaching Online Groups, by Donald E. Hanna, Michelle Glowacki-Dudka, and Simone Conceição:

135. Help your learners manage information.

With an abundance of text-based resources, managing information becomes an important skill to acquire when learning online. This calls for managing access to resources, academic discourse, information flow, and service arrangements.

Include in your syllabus all of the possible ways learners can access information through Internet hyperlinks or web-based procedures that emphasize certain skills.


And from our most recent addition to the 147 Tips series, 147 Practical Tips for Using Experiential Learning, edited by William M. Timpson, Jeffrey M. Foley, Nathalie Kees, and Alina M. Waite:

4. Engage, connect, and construct.

In experiential education, learning is an active and constructive process where knowledge is constructed by the interaction of the learner directly with the phenomena. The facilitator works to engage participants with the knowledge/experience and with each other.

Here the learner is an active participant whose individual life experiences, loves, passions, biases, and prejudice are intimately involved in the learning process. Together groups of students can create vibrant learning communities.

For an upcoming session, diagram the ways in which you would like to see the flow of information, ideas, and power happen. How can this model help you understand a particularly meaningful experience in the past?


You can find the complete list of books in our 147 Tips series here: http://www.atwoodpublishing.com/subjects/Tips%20series.htm

Stay tuned for more great tips!