Tips of the Week 6/3/14

Here’s a new batch of tips warmed perfectly by the summer heat, just in time for the start of June! As the semester closes and you transition into summer mode, remember to refresh your mind every now and then with new tips for your classroom, your practice, and yourself.


For educators looking to publish, here is a great tip (we should know!) from 147 Publishing Tips for Professors by Danny R. Arnold:

48. For each  project, decide whether you will write to a target audience or write the manuscript and let it find a home.

Should you tailor an entire project for a specific  target journal, or should you simply do a good job writing up the project and then find a home for it? The answer is YES. Actually, it depends on the project. At some point before you finish the manuscript, you certainly need to tailor it for a specific journal.

Two cautions are pertinent. First, developing a project for a narrow and/or unique journal can be dangerous. What if they do not like it? Second, you may want to evaluate early in the project whether the resulting manuscript might fit a small cluster of journals. Having multiple options for your work is desirable.


And from 147 Practical Tips for Teaching Diversity by William M. Timpson, Raymond Yang, Evelin Borrayo, and Silvia Sara Canetto:

68. Insist on responsible language

One fundamental ground rule for a safe environment that all members of the class community instructors and students alike respond to each other with understanding and empathy, especially when there are sharp disagreements.

Reexamine the language used in a particular class that dealt with some aspect of diversity. For the purposes of expressing and discussing more precisely, consider the impact of alternative language terms, concepts, qualifying adjectives and adverbs that could have been used.


Finally, we have another splendid tip from our forthcoming latest edition to the Tips series, 147 Practical Tips for Emerging Scholars by Kathy King and Ann Cranston-Gringas.

11. Identify and list the areas and strengths of your academic preparation and research interests.

Some of the strongest determinants in one’s early research and publication agenda will be one’s academic preparation focus and initial research interests. Indeed, for doctoral students, we recommend exploring research areas, building a foundation for your likely dissertation topic. In this manner, your work will build valuable background knowledge and perhaps data for your future effort. For early career faculty members, it is likely that your initial research and publication agenda will stem from your dissertation. Revisit the recommended future research sections of this document and your notes from your dissertation defense to see what leads you may uncover. We encourage faculty to explore more than one theme or focus of research in order to provide fresh perspectives, additional collaboration, publishing and funding opportunities.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.